Glaucoma Assessment in Mississauga, ON

Detecting health issues early is the best way to protect your health. When it comes to the eyes, eye exams are necessary to protect them from damage that could be caused by glaucoma. There are several different ways your optometrist can perform a glaucoma assessment to make sure your eyes are healthy. Patients under 40 should get comprehensive exams every 2 to 4 years, increasing in frequency as you get older.

Comprehensive Glaucoma Exams

When your doctor takes a look at your eyes to determine their health status, five different factors will be checked. These are used to make an accurate diagnosis of glaucoma and recommend effective treatment options and management of symptoms.

Tonometry

Tonometry is the pressure that is measured within the eye. Eye drops will be used to numb the eye, and then your doctor will use a tonometer to measure how much pressure is in the inner portion of your eye. An abnormal pressure measurement is above 20mm Hg while normal ranges are between 12 to 22mm Hg

Ophthalmoscopy

During this procedure, your doctor will examine the optic nerve to look for damage. The pupils are dilated using eye drops and the optometrist looks into your eyes to view the color and shape of your optic nerve. If the optic nerve looks abnormal, you may need more testing.

Perimetry

This tests how much your vision has been altered by glaucoma by using a moving light. This light passes through your peripheral vision and allows professionals to make a sort of map of your vision. If you’ve been diagnosed, this test is usually don’t every one or two years to check the progression of glaucoma.

Gonioscopy

This exam helps your eye expert determine how narrow or wide the angle of your eye is where the cornea meets the iris. A mirror is used to determine which type of glaucoma patients may have and recommend treatment that is appropriate and effective.

Pachymetry

This test is very simple and doesn’t involve any pain. It simply measures how thick your cornea is. A probe is placed in the cornea that measures its thickness to help your doctor at Falcon Vision Centre diagnose glaucoma more accurately.